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Video Editing Tips for YouTube

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Getting through a video shoot without making mistakes is next to impossible– in fact– it’s not gonna happen. But hiding your flub-ups and mistakes can be easy if you know a couple video editing hacks. In my keynotes, I talk extensively about the importance of creating a format for your YouTube videos in order to be a more efficient shooter (seriously- watch it).

Even with a formula, you’ll no doubt make a few mistakes. From stumbling over your words to taking long pauses in-between thoughts, you’ll have a need to edit your video creatively to look professional. In this video I’m going to show you how to use the cut and zoom technique to hide each and every one of your mistakes

Jump Cuts are Unprofessional

A jump-cut happens when two editing sequences  are put together without any creative blending. The end result is a jarring transition between to scenes that break the viewer from their concentration and distracts from the professionalism of your video.

Here’s an example of a jump-cut.

Cut_and_Zoom_GIF

This technique might be fine for a vlogger or a family channel but as a business or brand on YouTube, your videos should reinforce the quality of your company, your products, and your services. That being the case, a jump-cut simply wont cut the mustard for your YouTube video marketing plan. Instead, you’ll want to add this more sophisticated video editing tip to your repetoire for more professional looking videos.

Use the Cut-and-Zoom Video Editing Technique

As a YouTuber, I’ve been using the cut-and-zoom technique for years to hide my mistakes. The cut-and-zoom technique is a simple approach to taking two different video sequences and editing them together without any fancy blending, transitions, or technical know-how. When using this video editing hack, you’ll be able to repeatedly blend your good video snippets together while simultaneously editing out all the errors, flub-ups, and mistakes.

Here’s an example of how this technique works when complete (note: this is raw footage before green screen was removed):

Cut_and_Zoom1_GIF

Notice how this loop continues seamlessly over-and-over again! What you don’t see is that in between each cut I’ve removed multiple seconds (and in some cases actual minutes) of footage that I simply could not use in the video. With the cut-and-zoom technique I’m able to simulate a two-camera video shoot and edit my frames together without any jarring transitions that break the viewer from their concentration! Video Editing Techniques that Work Anywhere

The cut-and-zoom technique has worked in a variety of situations ranging from green screen to live video shoots and from talking head videos to video animations. A huge advantage to using this technique is that every linear editor (that’s worth talking about) has a scale feature. In some editors it might be called “scale” or “keyframe” but this technique will work across multiple editing softwares and should be your #1 go-to technique for professional videos.

Note: as of June 2015 Adobe Creative Cloud released a new transition called Morph that is designed to help blend jump cuts together. This is an AWESOME feature but it will only look professional in very specific situations. For the vast majority of your shooting, the cut-and-zoom technique will be your best option. 

What is your favorite video editing hack?
Let me know in the comments below or ask any questions that you might have & don’t forget to subscribe!

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About Owen Hemsath

Owen Video is the CEO of Videospot - an online marketing agency emphasizing video media production and paid ads management for small businesses. He's personally worked on over 1000 web videos for clients all over the country and teaches marketing through his YouTube channel. Owen is a regular contributor to Tubebuddy, GetResponse Email Marketing, and BeLive.TV and he's also the host of The Business of Video Podcast.

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